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FAQ

Q. How Do I Care & Clean My Solid Wood Furniture

A. Proper cleaning of your table ensures its beauty and longevity. We strongly recommend reading the tips below to keep your furniture in top condition.

How to Clean Solid Wood Furniture
There are many things that will collect on the surface of wood finishes. Such as cooking oils and fumes, fingerprints, dust, and smoking residue. Generally a soft damp cloth followed by a dry cloth will be all you need to clean the finish. If a cleaner is required, use only a very mild soap and wipe dry. A high quality furniture polish may be used occasionally. Apply polish with a soft cloth following manufacturer’s instructions. Avoid the use of silicone polishes as they may damage the wood finish if used over a period of time. Your local furniture store or hardware may carry Guardsman Furniture Polish (recommended for fine wood finishes).

Keep Furniture Out of Direct Sunlight
Every effort should be made to keep your table out of direct sunlight and heat sources such as radiators, hot air outlets or wood stoves. These conditions will cause the wood to dry out and subsequently split.

Check Humidity in Your Home
Humidity between 35 to 45 percent guards against shrinking and cracking or expansion. Basements with high humidity should be avoided. Do not place furniture near heat sources. You may choose to dehumidify or humidify depending on your environment. Extreme temperature and humidity will ruin wood.

Allow Wood Time to Cure
The materials that protect your finished furniture are dual component products that require 21 to 30 days to achieve maximum protection of the natural wood. In the curing process, damage can and will occur if caution is not used to protect this finish from hot materials placed on it. Use extra care to protect these products so your investment really can last a lifetime!

How do you protect your furniture? You can place coasters under hot cups or serving bowls. Use a table pad when possible to keep hot and heavy materials off the wood surface. In time, your table top will achieve it’s full protective properties, but for the first few weeks it needs tender care.

Helpful Furniture Care Tips

  • Avoid placing directly in front of or underneath windows.
  • Blot up spills immediately.
  • Lift items rather than dragging them across the furniture surface.
  • Rotate your accessories every once in a while.
  • Don’t place hot items directly on your furniture. If something is too hot to hold in your hand, it’s too hot for your furniture.

 

Q. I am looking for wood furniture to compliment my existing furniture.

A. In our store, we have just about any kind of oak and or solid hardwood item you can think of, from very large to very small. Dining tables, hutch and buffets, rockers, gliders, desks, file cabinets, occasional tables, curios, quilt racks and trunks, entertainment centers and stands, bedroom groupings, bookcases, barstools, wall shelves, trunks, jewelry cabinets, and the list goes on and on.

 

Q. I am looking for a custom  dinning table
A. At Mary Jane’s, we can custom build any piece to your particular specifications and needs.  We work directly with the very best and highly skilled Amish craftsmen who make the finest heirloom quality furniture.

We specialize in building our very own dining tables.  We use the highest quality materials and craftsmanship to create both beautiful and durable tables. Name your size, shape, color, wood, etc, and we will make it here.

 

Q. Do you use any woods besides oak?

A. Yes, we use various domestic hardwoods other than red oak, which includes cherry, soft or brown maple, hard maple, hickory, quarter sawn white oak.  Walnut and elm is also available for some items.  There are rustic varieties of woods as well, such as rustic quarter sawn white oak, rustic or character hickory, and rustic cherry.  These rustic woods have more knot holes, distress cracks, and various blemishes that give much character to the wood.  Red oak and brown maple generally are the lowest cost woods.  Rustic varieties can be equal to, but as much as 10 to 15 percent more than oak.  Grade ‘A’ cherry, hickory, hard maple, and quarter sawn white oak can be 30 to 40 percent more than red oak.